Blog

April 16th, 2015

164_B_OffIt’s a rainy friday evening. You just got home from your hour commute to work and are looking forward to unwind and catch a movie with your wife. As you loosen your tie, your phone vibrates and you see an urgent message awaiting. It’s from a new client who needs a scanned copy of his contract immediately. While you luckily have it on you, the nearest scanner is at Kinkos 10 miles down the road and that storm outside just seems to be getting worse. If you had the new Microsoft Office Lens, this wouldn’t be a problem. Yes, you might argue there are a number of other phone apps that can create scanned documents. But Office Lens is simply better. Here’s why you should be excited Office Lens is coming to iOS and Android.

What is Microsoft Office Lens?

Microsoft Office Lens is virtually a scanner in your pocket. You snap a picture of anything with text on it, and just like that it’s converted into a scanned document. What separates it from other similar apps out there is its ability to make the scanned text editable as if it were in a Word doc.

Unlike most of the other phone scanning apps, Office Lens automatically detects the borders of the item or document you’re scanning. This means you don’t have to bother lining up the edges of the item with a grid - you just point and shoot. The Lens app then optimizes the picture so that the text is easy to read. It does this by cleaning up shadows and straightening awkward angles. Also, the images you snap are automatically synced to OneNote. This allows you to easily store them, transfer to your other devices or share them later. Additionally, the images can also be saved to MS Word, Powerpoint or PDF. Originally launched in March of 2014, up until now Microsoft Office Lens was only available to Windows Mobile users. This seems a god sent to anyone who has had to rewrite scanned docs to make changes or reformat information.

To give you an idea of some of the items Microsoft Office Lens can scan, check out the list below:

  • business cards
  • billboards
  • receipts
  • invoices
  • notes
  • white boards
  • really anything that has text on it
Why is this cool? Well, imagine you’re at a meeting and there have been a long series of notes written on a white board. Instead of having to scribble all these notes down on a piece of paper, you can simply snap an image of the board. Afterwards you can edit the text from the whiteboard as you see fit, adding in your own notes or ideas.

How to get Microsoft Office Lens app

If you use an iOS device, you can download the app for free on iTunes.

As for Android, a fully functional version of the app is not yet readily available. However, you can get a preview version by joining the “Office Lens Android Preview” community on Google +. There you can sign up to become a tester.

Want to learn more about Office Lens and other Office products? Send us a message today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

April 15th, 2015

164_B_SecWe all know that computers can get infected with viruses, but did you know that your phone or tablet can as well? Yes, it is in fact true. And just because you have a new fancy Android device, doesn’t mean you’re immune. So if your phone or tablet starts acting funny and you suspect a virus is responsible, it’s time to take action with these six steps.

The lowdown on Android viruses

First off, let’s just put some things out there and clear the air. One, getting a virus on your Android product is actually incredibly rare. Two, when you see pop-up ads prompting you to buy a virus removal app, don’t freak out. This doesn’t automatically mean your device is infected. In fact, buying one of these apps could actually get you a virus! This is because all Android viruses are contracted via apps you install on the device. Which means the safest way to avoid getting one is to only install apps from the Google Play app store. If you must buy one outside of this, it’s wise to do your research first.

Before we get to what we think is the best solution, there are alternative ways to remove a virus that should be noted:

  • Use antivirus apps from Google Play - a lot of these are free and will detect and remove malicious apps, but some have a tendency to report apps as infected when they’re actually completely fine.
  • Perform a factory reset - if there’s a virus on your phone, this is a surefire way to remove it. However, in doing so you return your phone to its original factory settings. That means you’ll lose everything you’ve added since then that isn’t backed up.
Now that that’s out of the way, let’s get to the recommended option below.

How to remove the virus

  1. Turn safe mode on: To do this, access the power-off options by pressing the power button, then press and hold Power Off. This gives you the option to restart in safe mode. However, this doesn’t work with all models of the Android phone or tablet. If it doesn’t work with your device, a quick Google will pull up model-specific instructions. And what’s the point of turning on safe mode in the first place? Simple - it prevents any malware from running.
  2. Search for the infected app: Do this by opening Settings and then Apps. Once you’ve done this, be sure you’re looking at the Download tab (since the virus can only be something you’ve downloaded), and then start searching for the suspected app. If you don’t know the virus’s name, it’s likely something that looks out of place.
  3. Uninstall the app: Yes, it’s really that simple. Just click on the suspected app and uninstall it. Then you’re done. But if the name of the app is grayed out and you can’t even tap it, it means the virus has given itself Device Administration Status. In this case, follow the next three steps below.
  4. Remove Administrator Status: Do this by tapping on Settings and Security, then Device Administrators. Simply uncheck the infected app and hit Deactivate on the next screen.
  5. Uninstall the app: Now when you return to the Apps menu, the infected app will no longer be grayed out. Simply uninstall it.
  6. Restart your device: This takes it out of safe mode. Now your phone will be virus-free.
Want more ideas for Android and IT security? Don’t hesitate to give us a call today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
April 10th, 2015

MobileGeneral_Apr10_BRemember when sending a text meant punching hard on physical buttons on your old Nokia model? That was before the days of touchscreen smartphones, to whose smooth, gliding responsiveness to our fingers we have since become accustomed. But the technology revolution doesn’t stop there. Samsung has recently patented technology that will see touch screens give way to visual control screens, where a simple flicker of the eyes will determine what your phone does.

Some devices, both from Samsung and other manufacturers, already have security features which enable you to scan your face as a way to unlock your phone. This is the kind of eye control function that we might expect from future Samsung devices employing the technology that is the subject of the company’s latest patent. The patent doesn’t limit the application of this technology to phones, either, meaning that we could well see it deployed on devices like tablets, desktop computers and even televisions.

Imagine being able to play a song in your phone’s music streaming application, simply by blinking. Blink a second time and you could pull up various information about the song and artist - other movements allow you to activate further features in the app, whether that’s increasing the volume, pausing, rewinding or downloading other songs by the same artist. The patent lists eye movements including blinking, keeping them closed, and gazing at one spot for a prolonged period, each of which would be linked to specific in-device actions.

The race to implement technology to enable visual control of cell phones is not a new one - back in 2013, LG accused Samsung of having infringed on one of its eye-tracking patents with features available on the Samsung Galaxy 4S. Prior to the launch of the 4S, LG alleged that the phone’s Smart Pause function, which automatically pauses video when you take your eyes off the screen, violated a patent the company had applied for in 2009, and which covered the same technology on its Optimus G Pro device. However, when the 4S was eventually released, the Smart Pause and Smart Scroll features - the latter of which allows for browser and email scrolling without touching the screen - relied on facial recognition rather than eye tracking.

Similar features are available on Apple devices, and intended primarily for those with motor difficulties. Switch Control allows you to connect a switch to your iOS device for easier access, while since iOS 7.1 it has also been possible to use the device’s camera as a head switch, and then customize the settings to define head movements and which actions they trigger. Nonetheless, the ongoing innovations being attempted by firms like Samsung mean that this kind of device control is likely to become even more common and mainstream in the near future.

To find out how we can help you use the latest mobile technology in your business to drive productivity and greater revenue, contact us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

April 9th, 2015

164_B_MWGoogle Chrome, Firefox, and Opera walk into a bar. Firefox orders a drink, and says, “Yo, Chrome, where’s Internet Explorer? Didn’t you tell him to Google the name of the bar?” Chrome shakes his head. “Yeah, but he’s probably still waiting for the page to load.” Sadly this is what’s become of Internet Explorer - it is the butt of bad tech jokes. But there is hope for the future of Microsoft browsers. And the name of this hope is Spartan. Microsoft’s new kid on the block has some mind-blowing features that no one is laughing at.

What is Spartan?

Spartan is Microsoft’s new web browser that will be released later this year along with Windows 10. Microsoft’s aim is to build a browser that is designed for the modern web, which creates a more personable experience when interacting with it. Here are few of the incredible changes Spartan has in store.

Web Note

Also known as inking, Web Note allows you to edit web pages directly. You can do this by either typing them or using an interactive pen that allows you to literally circle, underline, or annotate pages as you see fit. These annotations can then be shared with friends and colleagues via email or social networking. They’ll also be stored on Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage for easy collaboration.

Reading View

A web page can be a busy place, and the guys at Microsoft know that. That’s why they’ve created Reading View, which provides distraction-free reading to keep you focused on the content. Reading View eliminates ads, fancy CSS styling, sidebars and comments, creating a simple format that feels as if you’re looking at an open book.

Cortana, your new personalized assistant

More and more phones are enabling their devices with personal assistants, so why not web browsers? Cortana is designed to make your web browsing experience easier and more personalized. For example if you’re looking up a business or restaurant, Cortana can provide additional information such as opening hours, address and contact info. Another nifty feature of Cortana allows you to get a definition or content explanation without leaving your current page. Just highlight the word, right click and select Ask Cortana. She’ll provide you with the info you’re looking for, right there on your web page.

Want to learn more about Spartan or other Microsoft Windows News and tips? Call us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

April 8th, 2015

By Matt Whitlock | ChannelPro Network

“If Redmond’s intention was not to compete with OEMs but inspire a new breed of portable computing device, its mission is now complete.”

The first time I saw the dual personality of Windows 8, I knew there was going to be a large shift in how we think about portable computers. Of course, vision to reality often takes a while, particularly when hardware and OEMs are involved.

The de facto PC OS has been ready to power hybrid notebooks that flip, fold, and separate, offering both a touch-capable interface for mobile computing and a productivity environment for traditional computing. As is the case with so many of Microsoft’s efforts, the capabilities of the software exceeded the OEMs’ (and typical PC users’) ability to embrace change, and also beat to market the kind of hardware necessary to make a no-compromise 2-in-1.

Even Microsoft’s Surface lineup of ultra-powered tablets is no exception to compromise. The first few generations were successful in proving a tablet can be just as powerful as a notebook, but only by shooting for the high end of the market, disregarding “lapability” and battery life almost entirely, and always coming in a little too small to truly replace the mainstream notebook. The Surface Pro 3 has found a much better balance than the earlier generations on most fronts, but has desperately needed a clamshell keyboard base and lower price point.

Read entire article here…

April 8th, 2015

164_B_ProdEvery day it seems like there’s some new revolutionary technology, app, or update released that’s touted as the answer to our productivity woes. And while technology sure can solve a lot of problems, does it always make our jobs easier? If you take a moment to think seriously about this, you’ll likely agree that technology can sometimes actually be a hindrance. So for when you’re trying to find how to use technology to your business’s greatest good, here are a few questions you need to ask yourself.

Is this making my job easier or harder?

There’s no questioning that technology can make our lives better and our jobs easier, but it can also make everything more difficult. Here are a few ways it can slow you down:
  • Distraction - From email to Facebook to Skype or Gchat, technology can be a 24-hour distraction. If you are constantly switching between technology apps and programs - whatever your reason - you’ll certainly end up in a state of distraction, causing your productivity to take a hit.
  • Too complex - Some technology is simply too complex for the average user. To fix this problem, either use technology that is more user-friendly, or leave your IT guy to the job.
  • Too much - There are simply hundreds and thousands of apps and programs that can be used to make your workflow and job easier, but if you use too many you’ll likely be slowed down as you bounce between them all. The trick is to use only what you need, and nothing more.

Does my tech work?

This is almost a no-brainer. Your tech needs to work in order for you to reach your maximum productivity. If you’re still using a break/fix contractor and you’re calling him every other week, is this increasing or inhibiting your productivity? The answer is pretty obvious - it’s probably slowing you down. So what do you do? You need to get a more effective technology solution that is going to “just work”.

If you’re a small business owner, one way to do this is through managed services. This is a hands-off solution where an MSP handles all your IT, usually for a fixed monthly fee, so you never have to think about it. MSPs are proactive about preventing problems from ever occurring in the first place, meaning you’ll have fewer IT issues creating disruption and downtime in your workday.

Is this tech job my responsibility?

Just because you know how to troubleshoot a broken application, does that mean you should? If you’re a business owner or have a job role outside of the tech department, it will benefit you in the long run to leave the job to the tech team. Why? It’s for the same reason the owner of a restaurant doesn’t mop the floors or clean the toilets. They have better things to do with their time, and so do you. You have a specific role for a reason, and you’re creating the most value for your company when you stick to that role. Do yourself and the tech team a favor and leave the tech alone; you have a business to run.

Want more ideas on how to maximize your productivity and use technology to its greatest good? Give us a call and let’s talk today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Productivity
April 6th, 2015

BusinessContinuity_Apr6_BThe one mistake most small business owners make is not thinking about a disaster before it happens. Unfortunately, when their businesses are threatened with a sudden flood and massive data loss, it’s already cost them plenty of time and money. Disasters can come in a variety of forms, whether as a result of natural causes or man-made errors - but it’s important to remember that the damage they cause can be minimized. A disaster recovery plan can put your business back on its feet during a crisis. Here are four ways to save your business from disaster.

Cloud backup

One of the most serious side effects disasters inflict on your business is preventing access to data. This is a major inconvenience, especially if you need to communicate with clients on a daily basis. Make sure all your crucial data is safe by using a cloud-based backup solution. With the power of the cloud, your files are stored and accessible from anywhere, and at any time. Cloud backup provides convenience and enhanced uptime, ensuring business continuity during a disaster.

Get disaster insurance

Disaster insurance can help cover the costs of repairing damage caused by certain disasters. Many business owners think they have sufficient insurance coverage, only to find out later that their policy didn’t cover a disaster scenario. Take the time to consult with your insurance agent to understand what is, and what is not, covered by your insurance. If necessary, consider buying additional coverage from your insurance provider.

Prepare your employees

Many businesses regard employees as their most valuable assets. In the event of a disaster you will rely on them not only to execute the disaster recovery plan, but to also keep your business running. Unfortunately, if your employees or their families are also affected by a natural disaster, they won’t be able to concentrate on their work. That’s why you need to prepare your staff for coping with a disaster as well as your business. It could be something as simple as issuing a handbook to cope with crises, sending emails to alert employees, or preparing emergency supplies and communication devices to meet immediate needs.

Create a contingency plan

Review all your business operations and identify areas that are crucial for your organization’s survival. Establish a procedure for managing those functions during a disaster. For instance, you can make a list of all suppliers and their contact information. If your suppliers are located near your business, you should have secondary contacts in other locations. Establish an assembly place where your employees can continue to run the business if your main premises become inaccessible. Once you have a contingency plan in place, make sure you review it with your employees at least twice a year so you don’t forget any crucial details.

When your business is hit by a disaster, the top priority is to keep your daily operations running as normally as possible. If you want to learn more about planning for a disaster, give us a call today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

April 2nd, 2015

SocialMedia_Mar30_BIf you use a Facebook page to promote your business online, you’ll know that your like count - the number of users who have liked your page - is among the most critical metrics you monitor in order to understand the reach and success of your social marketing activities. The more "likes" you have, the more people that will see your posts, and the more likely it is too that those posts will appear in their friends’ feeds, spreading the message further. But Facebook has announced that page owners should expect a drop in likes - here's the lowdown.

Facebook’s announcement means that since March 12 you may have seen a drop in the number of likes, or fans, attributed to your page. If you’ve been wondering what you did wrong to cause the drop, you can rest assured that it’s unlikely to be a result of ineffective marketing or unengaging content on your part. Rather, Facebook has been hard at work removing inactive accounts from the social network.

The kind of Facebook accounts affected by the move are those of deceased users whose friends or family have opted to have the profile memorialized. The page remains visible, but is clearly marked as in remembrance of the user and becomes a place for relatives to share memories. Accounts also affected are those whereby the user has opted to deactivate their profile and take a break from the site. In the case of deactivated profiles, if the user later returns to Facebook and begins using their profile again, the like will be re-added to your page’s count at that point.

In making this move, Facebook aims to ensure that the like count for a page more accurately reflects the number of active users who actually see and engage with the page’s content. There’s no denying that it is easy to become distracted by high like counts, when often the reality is that only a fraction of those users are the people you are aiming to target, or indeed real humans at all. The social network already filters out likes and comments for specific posts from those with deactivated or memorialized accounts, so this change simply represents an extension of this policy to the more visible metric of a page’s overall like count. From Facebook’s perspective, the move also helps it to deliver a better overall experience, since taking the bloatedness out of artificially inflated numbers helps users get a better idea of which pages are popular and which are most relevant to their needs and interests.

Businesses should consider Facebook’s shift a positive one, since it leaves you with a clearer perspective on the real audience your page is getting and removes the potential to be seeking false comfort from a high page count that doesn’t actually reflect the level of active engagement. The move has echoes of recent efforts by Instagram to flush out spam accounts from its system - some high-profile celebrities saw their follower counts drop by the thousands after these accounts were banished. Though the dip in Facebook page likes may continue for a further few weeks as more accounts are flushed out from the count, most page owners will notice only a small difference. If you suffer a more drastic drop, treat it as a wake-up call to try new tactics to deliver engaging content and organically drive a more genuine Facebook audience.

Need advice on how to build a social media audience and use it to generate leads? Get in touch today and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
April 1st, 2015

iPhone_Mar27_BAre you fed up of having to waste time integrating your Google Calendar entries with your iPhone to enjoy the benefits of access to your schedule on the go? Your life could be about to get a little easier, thanks to Google’s long awaited release of its Calendar app for the iPhone. Enjoy synchronizing your days with all the features you love about Google Calendar, without ever having to leave your Apple comfort zone.

Like its Android sibling, Google Calendar for iPhone takes a colorful approach to displaying your engagements in a daily or three-day view; much like the web version, events from different calendars are categorized by color for quick and easy identification. As well as your existing Google calendars, the app imports and works with any different calendars you already have setup using your phone’s own tools. You can also take a step back and look at the whole month at a glance - though you don’t see individual appointments in this view, it allows you to select a specific date from the calendar and zoom back in to check what you have going on.

Continuing the aesthetic theme, the app takes your diary entries and prettifies them - think a background image of palm trees if you enter the details of your upcoming holiday to the Bahamas. You’ll also get useful supporting data for your day-to-day events, like maps to get you to your next meeting or an idea of the weather when you jet into a new city for the night. And if you’re a Gmail user, you can have the app automatically create events from your email - perfect for having details of meetings and travel bookings plugged into your schedule for easy reference. Features like this bring you the benefits of travel planning apps like Tripit without the hassle of having to forward each email confirmation across first.

Adding diary engagements manually is a breeze, too - this functions in much the same way as the web-based Google Calendar, except that you can tap into your iPhone’s contact list to select those you want to invite to your events. The app can also go some way to predicting where you’ll host each event, and so autofill the location for you.

While many of the features of the app are not dissimilar to things you can already accomplish using Google Calendar on the web, the app’s release means all of those tools are finally bundled up and easily accessible to those of us who just can’t stray too far from our iPhone. A switch to the new Google Calendar for iPhone app means a big step up in performance and productivity if you’re currently using the far more basic features of your phone’s in-built calendar app.

Want to learn more about using the iPhone in a business setting? Give us a call today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPhone
April 1st, 2015

Security_Apr1_BEmail is one of the best things the internet has made possible. We use email to signup for websites, apply for jobs, make payments, and much more. But when we put more sensitive information into our emails, we also are exposing ourselves to the risk of data theft. What's more, you stand to lose more than just an email account if hackers get their hands on your vital information. So, here are some tips to strengthen your email security.

Use separate email accounts

Most people use a single email account for all their personal needs. As a result, information from websites, newsletters, shopping deals, and messages from work get sent to this one inbox. But what happens when someone breaks into it? There’s a good chance they would be able to gain access to everything else.

Having multiple email accounts will not only boost your security, but also increases your productivity. You can have a personal account to communicate with your friends and family, another solely for receiving emails from work, and one recreational account for various website registrations and getting newsletters. Wise email users never put all their eggs in one basket!

Set strong passwords

Too many email accounts have predictable passwords. You might be surprised to learn that email passwords like ‘123456’, ‘qwerty’, and ‘password’ itself are still the most common around. For the sake of security, be a little more selective with your passwords. Spending a few moments on coming up with a good password will be beneficial in the long run. Mix upper and lower case letters, numbers, and special characters to form a unique password that makes sense and is memorable to you, but no-one else. Also, never use the same password for all your email accounts. This way, if someone hacks one of your accounts, all of the others are still safe.

Beware of links and attachments

When you see a link in an email, don’t click on it unless you’re expecting the link from a known source, such as from your friend or a confirmation link for your game account registration. The truth is that you never know where those links might lead you. Sometimes they can be safe, but other times they can infest your computer with viruses and malware.

Similarly, if you’re expecting a file from your friend or family, then go ahead and open the attachment. It’s always good to know the person sending the file. But be wary of attachments in emails from strangers. Even if the file name looks like a JPEG image, you should never open it. File names can be spoofed, and innocent files may be a clever virus in disguise, ready to latch itself onto your computer the moment you click on it.

Beware of email phishing

Phishing is a type of online scam when malicious users send you an email, saying that they’re representatives from high-profile websites like eBay, Facebook or Amazon. They claim that there’s a problem with your account, and that you should send them your username and password for verification. The fact is that, even if there was a genuine issue with your account, these companies would never ask for your password. You should ignore these phishing emails and sweep them into your spam box.

It all comes down to common sense when you’re dealing with email security issues. If you’re looking to secure your business emails, give us a call today and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security